Short stories by John Edgar Wideman.

John Edgar Wideman (born June 14, 1941) is an American novelist, short story writer, memoirist, and essayist. He was the first person to win the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction twice. His writing is known for experimental techniques and a focus on the African-American experience. Raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Wideman excelled as a student athlete at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1963, he became the second African American to win a Rhodes Scholarship to attend the University of Oxford. In addition to his work as a writer, Wideman has had a career in academia as a literature and creative writing professor at both public and Ivy League universities. In his writing, Wideman has explored the complexities of race, family, trauma, storytelling, and justice in the United States. His personal experience, including the incarceration of his brother, has played a significant role in his work. He is a professor emeritus at Brown University and lives in New York City and France.[1]

Listing 31 stories.

A young man reunites with his father, and they share a meal and a movie. Years later, he reflects on the memory as he struggles to reconcile his complex emotions about fatherhood.

In 2018, a pedestrian on the New York City’s Lower East Side witnesses a young Black couple in love, prompting a consideration about the storytelling, hope, and Nelson Mandela.

A man attends a classical music concert and uses it as a surrealistic form of escape as he copes with the news of his mother's death.

When a dog discovers a dead child in a trash can, his owner seeks help from a local family man.

A young boy born into slavery meets a newly purchased slave from Africa who refuses to let go of his culture, despite the master's attempts to christianize him.

A lonely man hears a story about a blind African-American basketball player and wonders if the story may have saved his broken relationship.

A Black couple vacationing in France implodes after facing countless microaggressions, taking their discontent out on one another.

A devoted mother wants to protect her children's innocence, but this changes when her son gravely injures her only daughter.

An American visits an Israeli friend from his past who had recently emigrated to Maine and gotten remarried. They discuss the hostage situation in the Middle East and she reflects on where her loyalties lie.

In conversation, a Black girl recalls the day she ate a caterpillar as a child, and her mother discloses the more violent events that happened the same day.